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union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
. senators continued debate today on normalizing trade relations with russia. a vote expected shortly after noon today. and not to live coverage of the u.s. senate here on c-span2. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. god of wonder, beyond all majesty, you alone are worthy of our praise. stay with us, bringing your grace and gladness to brighten our lives. lord, remove our sins from us and cleanse us with your spirit, emancipating us from fears about what tomorrow may hold. continue to direct the steps of our lawmakers, keeping them from eleventh-hour decisions that bring unintended negative consequences. remind them that the cost of indecision may be much higher than they anticipate. purple them of the things that increase discord, that in unity they may serve you with fanalfulness. we pray in your sacred name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisib
one unapologize? that is later in grapevine. up next, look at politics behind russia move to ban american adoptions of russian orphans. . now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. smoke? nah, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >> doug: checking international news now. iran kicked off six days of naval drills in strait of hormuz. they're aimed to showcase naval abilities in shipping route that sees 40% of the sea born oil exports. iran claimed it could block the strait if it came under attack on the nuclear program. "associated press" reports that recent satellite photos indicate north korea repai
as pntr, with russia and moldova and to update russian human rights legislation. we have to take many difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them. in fact, this is a rare opportunity to pass a good bill that we all can agree on. pntr is good for united states jobs. russia is a fast-growing market. when russia joined the w.t.o. in august, it opened its markets to the other 155 members of the w.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for the
what is going to happen next. >> russia has invited the officers of the syrian national coalition for parks, and is urging president bashar al-assad to do the same. they say russia must first condemn the president before dialogue him take place. russia says the transitional government should be put in place, with bashar al-assad staying in power. >> we have already had dialogue in cairo. we expressed readiness to meet with them, and are still ready. as we understand, they do not have any objection regarding the offer to leave. we are against interference from outside parties in syria. we understand we need a ceasefire. we agreed the geneva convention contains the elements to move forward for political settlement. >> in the caesarian title, schilling has devastated large parts of the city, including a large suburbs. the rebels say they have also made gains in eastern syria. fighters say they have captured this oil field. tens of thousands of mainly sunni iraqis turned out to protest the government. they are accusing maliki of marginalizing sunni leaders. >> a sea of people gatherin
has denied any intention of using chemical weapons. russia, a key syrian ally, dismissed the intelligence reports as rumors. yesterday in istanbul, russian president vladimir putin said he understands turkey's concerns about border security, but he warned that deploying patriot missiles could raise fears of a wider conflict. meanwhile, inside syria intense fighting flared again near damascus today. amateur video showed government warplanes carrying out new arrayeds. the syrian capital has seen escalating violence in the last week as rebels try to close the noose on president bashar al assad's regime and the military tries to recapture lost ground. amid the fighting, the state news agency reported that rebel more tar fire killed nine students and a teacher at a school outside damascus today. the opposition also reported the incident but did not say who fired the mortar. meanwhile, there are meanwhile, there are indications that russia's position on syria may be changing. the "new york times" reports that the russians had agreed to a new strategy to persuade president assad
from one nation to the next. it's about to happen in russia. where moscow is going to approve a ban on american couples only from adopteding russian children. we just improved our trade relations with them, why are they doing this? have our relations with the putin regime deteriorated that much? senior fellow with the center of transatlantic relations at johns hopkins university. what is this really about? >> this is about vladimir putin playing to his base which is nationalistic and poor as he's losing moscow and it's about vladimir putin sending a signal to the united states that he does not want us interfering in russia's internal affairs and this is a convenient way to send that message. >> let's, explain why they would think that with this trade status improvement there was a little clause that said if someone violates human rights in russia you're not going to be able to get a vase to get in here. what is this law called? >> the magity insky bill. >> sergei died in prison. who helped kill him. >> the reason he was in prison, he's a lawyer. he was defending a guy who is a frequ
was the beginning of the coup d'État, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit co
, family dreams frozen. >> thanks to a chilly relationship between the u.s. and russia, the future of a lot of children is hanging in the balance. so details on that, straight ahead. >>> "world news ♪ ♪ >>> welcome back, everyone. and welcome is what dozens of american families may not get the chance to do when it comes to children they're hoping to adopt from russia. >> russian president vladamir putin will sign a bill blocking americans from adopting russian children. >> reporter: when russia bans adoptions to the united states, this is who gets caught in the middle. an american mother and a 5 1/2-year-old orphan with spina bifida named paulina. a little girl who is already learning to count in english and tells her mommy she loves her. >> i love you, too. >> reporter: kendra skaggs and her husband last saw paulina a few days ago on a visit to her orphanage in moscow. now, with the love only a mother can feel, she worries what will happen to her daughter. >> i can't help her. i can't tell her i love her. so it's really hard. >> reporter: americans have adopted over 60,000 russian chil
rights violators in russia. it was sparked by the death of a russian lawyer who died died in jail investigating a fraud case at the request of americans in russia. it singles out dozens of russians that police believe are connected to that case. they can't travel to the united states and their assets are frozen. russia has been defiant in this case. it is even launching a posthumous price for the new law and russian voices speaking of saying it's not fair to penalize children. having adopted 60,000 over last two decades, and as you mentioned, there are several dozen cases right now that are pending. several dozen russian children who are in the final stages of this adoption process. those who should be coming to the united states very soon. it is not clear what's going to happen to them. it's very sad because the parents and children have had numerous visits to russia by the parents. the russians have put them through the loops to see the u.s. governm says it will fight to see that these cases come together. but the law is not clear at this point what is going to happen. heather:
saws russia because they grow during the war and the soviet union, don't forget the arm themselves across the mountains and we make themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and reconstruction and dedication of the people and of the losses of the soviets with this 22 or 27 million the stalin's it doesn't matter they plunged into this thing and it was a crucible for them at the war. but the british churchill has a fascinating overlay on this because he has a different motive it seems. once the british islands are saved in the battle of britain his goal seems to be truly to regain the empire. he said i do not mean to dismember the british empire. and the whole -- the whole concept of going to north africa, sending troops into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the b
to face. when russia, he had to meet them, take the measure, and make him his partner in avoiding war. the issue, ike wrote, in a smart letter to a friend in 1956, quote, is not merely man against man or nation against nation. it is man against war. in the summer of 1959, ike invited crus choof to the united states, and they went over the suburbs to see houses and cars, and he pretended to see just the rush hour traffic jams but asked to buy three hell cometters and a boeing 747. [laughter] he met marilyn monroe. ike invited him to camp david. where is this camp david, he asked? he was suspicious, wondering if the americans wanted to kidnap him. at camp david, ranted and threatened that the tanks would roll in berlin. the top aide wrote impasse on a piece of paper. ike took a nap and had an idea. ike's farm was close by. called his darnel, barbara, and told her to have the kids all spruced up on the porch of the farmhouse in 30 minutes. he brought him to meet them. ike's great insight about him was that he was a survivor. he survived hitler and stalin, after all. the kremlin leaders,
children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set everything up and can't go pick up the kids. horrible. anyway, a maryland pizza delivery man fights off a group of attackers. his reward? a demotion. >> he sucker punched me. my glasses flew off. i dropped the
. 7:30 a.m. sunday, right? eastern time. sanjay gupta, don't miss him. >>> russia's government trying to put the brakes on american parents adopting russian children. coming up next, the impact families here in the u.s. and really what is being done to stop this proposed ban. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. >>> helping newtown heal. one week after the tragic school shooting at that elementary school, some people coping with unimaginable sorrow are turning to dogs. take a look. >> he's a comfort dog. you can pet him. it says right here, please pet me. a comfort dog is whatever brings comfort to other people, when they're suffering or hurting or brings happiness to people, helps people process their grief. >> it's okay, abbie. it's good girl. ye
here? >> reporter: yes, gregg. russia is furious about a u.s. law which puts visa bans and asset freezes on 60 russians that congress believes were involved in some way or complicit in the deaths of a russian lawyer in jail in 2009. now he was investigating a massive fraud case at the request of a u.s. company in russia that believed millions of dollars it paid to the russian government in tax money were diverted, stolen by russians with connections to the government. he was 30 self -- 37 years old when he died and the allegations are that at best he was denied medical treatment while in jail. at worse he was tortured. russia has been very defiant in this case and trying him posthumously for fraud. the russian government passed this ban, what appears to be retaliatory law prohibiting americans from adopting russian orphans, naming the law after a 2-year-old boy who died while in the custody of u.s. adopted parents a few years ago. gregg? gregg: amy, are there repercussions here? >> reporter: there certainly are. even though this law was passed pretty much unanimously in russia's
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
the british empire. we are cutting power, so does russia because they grow during the war. they arm themselves and remake themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and deconstruction and the losses of the soviets, whether it's 22 or 20 million, doesn't matter. the idea of the whole nation plunged into this thing. it was a crucible for them. a great war. but the british -- churchill has a different motive. once the british islands are saved by the -- in the battle of britain, is goal seems to be to regain the empire. he said i did not become prime minister to dismember the british empire, and the whole consent of going into north africa, sending troops to the belly of the nazi empire, regaining greece, which is a tremendous story -- everyone talks about eastern europe. what bet the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started dive-bombing the streets of athen and killing'm residents who fought against the nazis and that's never pointed out. look at what stalin did in poland. he broke this and that. i don't believe he broke yalta. look what the british did. no one ever po
for russia's weapons that were made for were times that anybody can get. >> i think all that is true. i do think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in the 1990's, and that it works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's
? >> the group was more optimistic than many people in looking at the world. they see russia as a country that doesn't pose any threats now and really won't, can't for many years. they see china as a potential threat in the future but recognize we have common interests in china which would ease that threat. and they see the great instability in the middle east as posing specific threats to us such as the chemical weapons in syria which could fall in the hands of terrorists, but see these threats as threats to be managed, not to be resolved once and for all. meaning we can protect the chemical weapons. we don't have to go in and turn syria into a democracy. >> you want the united states to build one of the points that the report makes early on, to build on comparative strengths and address comparative weaknesses. from your standpoint what are those strengths that need to be built on, and then what are the weaknesses that need to be addressed? >> well, our military forces have unprecedented capabilities. we've spent a lot over the last 10 years, as you know, and it shows in our naval power,
in the hundreds aside from the u.s. and russia. and they would have to be included which is a complication. >> i want to take you to the question of strategy and strategy formulation. there are those who say that the united states has lost its ability to think and to act strategically if you look at for example our involvement in iraq, there are those who say that was strategically unwise and became something that was negative to the united states' broad interests. if you look at where we are now closing in on a fiscal cliff or fiscal crises of our own making that could then become obviously problematic for america's borrowing capabilities and economic health more broadly. have we combated strategic thinking. if so why and what do we have to do to become better at strategic thinking. >> attention to the inbox is killing us because it takes away our opportunity to think in long-term -- and to do long- term thinking. and to think strategically. there's no part of the government that really does strategic thinking well now. i mean the state department has a policy planning organization. they don't
be expected on saturday. >> thank you very much. >>> american families adopt hundreds of children from russia each year. today a new sign the russian government could soon ban all of those adoptions entirely. russia's president vladimir putin weighing in on the matter today. what his decision could mean for the children waiting to join families right here in the united states. >>> and the latest on the condition of former president george h.w. bush after his spokesperson confirmed "a series of setbacks" have put the president in the intensive care unit. we are live outside the hospital. stay close. >>> family and friends now visiting the former president george h.w. bush who is hospitalized in houston, texas. doctors moved president bush to the intensive care unit after a series of setbacks including a fever and cough that were not going away. the president is the oldest live willing former leader of our nation at age 88. but today in his e-mail to his staff he suggested the president is not on his death bed. he said "president bush would ask me to tell you to please put the harps back in the
is russia because they grow during the war. don't forget they armed themselves and they remake themselves. it's an extraordinary story of migration reconstruction and dedication to the people in the losses of the soviets, whether it's 22 or 27 million whether stalin kills, doesn't matter. the ideas the whole nation plunged and there was a crucible for them, a great war. the british, churchill is a fascinating overlay on this because he has a different motive it seems. once the british islands are saved by the battle of britain, his goal seems to be truly to regain the empire. he said it did not become prime minister to dismember the british empire. and the whole concept of going to north africa, sending troops off to the southern nazi empire in italy in the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. ever in talks about history of europe and as an outsider i'm saying what about the british when they went back in 1944 and started divebombing the streets of athens and killing the people, communists are sisters who thought -- fought valiantly against the nazis. the british were
. >> and is russia vladimir putin playing with children's lives . what he just did. >>> and the newspapers that published the names of licensed gun owners. fox and friends starts right now. ♪ >> julia: hello, everybody. >> three days left. three days left before we go head first over the fiscal cliff. >> julia: before we talk about the fiscal cliff. you did cavuto. you did o'rielly or i mean not o'rielly. the five. today you have this show and then cavuto and then on the five. >> you will be on the five. >> julia: and then other things. >> it is one of those days. iclele ladies and gentlemen, eric bowling -- boling is the mara thon man. >> it is good to be here. >> julia: yes, it is good to be here. >> kelly: thank you for joining us this morning. >> julia: the headlines and fox news alert it appears russian president vladimir putin is trying to make a political point at the expense of orphans. he signed a bill that bans americans from adopting russia children. i can't believe this happening in retaliation law for cracking down on russia human rights vialators. >> these children are not
the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers and never gave them too much credit. interesting enough all the buildings in khobar were told by the bin laden construction company and they had the bin laden stamps on all of the buildings. how is that for irony? but after that things kind of changed and the world trade center bombings and september 11 of course, we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning and had come back from the middle east from another
, and it -- russia. 70% of the world's energy is here. and energy becomes so dramatically contagious, what do you do, briefly on human rights, i do believe actually the big difference between the democracy and dictatorship is simply this, a soft asset but very important one that india doesn't record human-rights that we will necessarily be proud of but -- i believe that china may be a successful nation that cannot be a modern nation and the only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the quality and presents and until then if it is successful -- >> let me say three things. i want to follow on the admiral's comments about democracy, it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the united states has not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple votes short. i think senator mikulski for her encouragement. i hope we will be able to take that up again and get it done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we are making which is these potential conflicts over territory from reed bank and
that the nuclearhu balance between the united states and russia under new s.t.a.r.t. force levels would be stable except, of course, for the huge diversity or disparity, i would say, in tactical nucleac weapons that russia enjoys. but under this stability there would be no be incentives to strike first during a crisis, nor would there be incentives to grow our respective nuclearhoul arsenals in the future. we should, therefore, think very carefully before we contemplate changes to longstanding u.s. nuclear deterrence policies orer pursue further reductions ins support of the president's the armament agenda. we absolutely cannot know for n certain that fewer numbers of weapons will make us safer. in fact, henry kissinger and brent scowcroft recently us reminded us, quote: that strategic stability is not inherent with low numbers of weapons. indeed, excessively low numbersn which surprisewh attacks are conceivable, end of quote. policymakers would do well to heed the advice of winston churchill offered in his last address to the united states congress. be careful, he said, above all things not to l
completely. what is on the agenda? some minor bill like exporting bill relating to a wheat deal with russia and some conservative republican senator from the midwest introduced an amendment that would limit the president's power and kennedy people are just prepared to let it go through. not johnson. he says i want that bill stopped. his exact words are i want that bill merger. he doesn't want it just defeated. he wants to defeated by enough to show congress there's a new president now and you can't treat him the same way you were -- you can't treat me the way you were treating him. he stays on and calls in his vote counter and they don't even know, they tell him they have a certain number of votes but johnson is the greatest vote counter. he counts the votes and realizes they don't. all night he stays on the telephone making calls to senators and the bill is murdered. johnson writes in his memoirs at that moment, the power of the federal government began flowing back to the white house. and it did. one of the things this book, "the passage of power," is about, really, is about how lyndon jo
're are nuclear weapons in india and pakistan, nuclear weapons in china, as, as well as in russia. so that's quite spread there in that part of the world. the threat always that iran will finally develop a nuclear weapon or more. that israel probably has nuclear weapons. >> and preparing for all these threats is not cheap. >> much as we may not like it. if we're going to maintain our military edge we're going to have to keep spending an awful lot of money in the future because the nature of the threats we face is so unpredictable and we just have to prepare for a whole range of scenarios. >> when we think about the costs to ourselves of maintain the sea logic communication, maintaining a big navy, maintaining a big force in general, uh, the only really intelligent way to look at this is to think about what are the costs of not doing that? what are the costs if this global order breaks down? i think those costs need to be thought about as well. (instrumental music) >> with all those threats to consider, where are defense dollars best spent in 2013. for some the answer is clear, asia. >> earlier thi
to end the fighting in syria. her meeting with russia's foreign minister came as rebels intensified the fighting around the capital of damascus. now, speaking for the first time about the meeting, secretary clinton laid out her vision of a syria without president assad. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unifyied, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented; sunni, alawite, christians, kurds, jews, men, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future. and a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. heather: secretary clinton also called the meeting a beginning and warning that there's still a lot of hard work ahead. jon? jon: the world is waiting for assad's next move. if intelligence reports are correct, he already has ordered his military to prepare chemical weapons. those, we can only presume, would be used against his own people. recent rebel victories seem to give him more incentive to use such weapons, so what can we expect if he does? how do we react, and
balance between the united states and russia under new start force levels would be stable except, of course, for the huge diversity or disparity, i would say in tactical nuclear weapons that russia enjoys. but under the stability there would be no incentives to strike first during a crisis nor would there be incentives to grow our respective nuclear arsenals in the future. we should, therefore, think very carefully before we contemplate any changes to long-standing u.s. nuclear deterrence policies or pursue further reductions in support of the president's disarmament agenda. we absolutely cannot know for certain that fewer numbers of weapons will make us safer. in fact, henry kissinger and brent scowcroft recently reminded us -- quote -- "that strategic stability is not inherent with low numbers of weapons. indeed, excessively low numbers could lead to a situation in which surprise attacks are conceivable." policy-makers would do well to heed the advice of winston churchill, offered in his last address to the united states congress. "be careful," he said. "above all things not to
of crisis. there were constant crisis in the 1950s. in china, russia, berlin, korea and vietnam and ike would bluff with nuclear weapons and he was determined to keep us out of war. >> do you think he was an isolationist? >> no. he believed we had to be in the world and very much for native. the first supreme allied commander and he opposed his own party that had a strong isolationist right wing at the time. >> looking back at eisenhower and we had this conversation off camera, i guess i could say he's the closest person we had to an independent or less partisan, least partisan president ideal origin ly. >> a lot of people didn't know if he was a democrat or republican. both parties asked him to run. in his heart he was more of a republican, but it was useful for him to float above politics. he was a great politician. you don't get to be commander of anything unless you are. >> how much politics there is in the military. >> absolutely. >> you don't get the star for just what you did on the battlefield. >> he was very good at dealing with the giant egos he had to deal with. churchill and
and russia and the leadership and their motives, but sometimes it was just to talk about how to organize his day. clinton would run through his way dey with nixon, this is when i'm waking up, eating, organizi organizing, is this how you did it? who else can you talk to about that? >> the book is "the presidents club." >> a great, great club. >> thank you to doris and john as well. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again.
in russia. it faces another vote before it can be signed into law. russia is one of the top sources for international adoptions over a 12-year period, more than 45,000 u.s. adoptions came from russia. >>> and on this first day of winter, a powerful winter storm and one of the busiest travel days of the year. it's adding up to be a big headache for those trying to get out of town for the holiday. this storm that hammered the midwest, it's now on the move and cnn meteorologist's alexandra steele, how bad could it get? >> it's been rough and it's getting rough tonight. here's what is happening with the delays, predominantly in new york, laguardia, jfk. boston as well. laguardia to newark to boston. san francisco has had four-hour delays. now 3 1/2 hours and it is weather-related there, too. ft. lauderdale is having a volume issue. this is the exiting storm, this rain that is leaving. skies are drying out but temperatures will drop precipitously. this is where the travel will really get tough. rochester, buffalo, six to 12 inches of knsnow coming for the. washington, baltimore, clears o
, everyone, russia's vladimir putin, now banning the adoption of russian children by americans as of january 1, even halting the adoptions already in progress dealing an emotional blow to many families including our next guest. robert and kim summers are parents in the process of adopting a russian child and they're afraid they'll never see him again. robert and kim, good morning to both of you. >> good morning. >> dave: i'm sorry what you're going through and what the russian president is doing is despicable to say the least. you were so close, felt it was a part of your family, tell me how difficult it's been. >> you can't fathom the pain, it feels like losing your child. this is our son and we have spent so many-- so much time waiting to get to this happy point and as a matter of fact, i looked at my husband this morning and said two weeks to go and we'll be in russia holding our son. and now that's so-- we don't know where we're at. >> dave: robert. in terms of the process and in terms of the emotional commitment, tell me how far along you are in this process. >> emotionally we're draine
.s. families when it takes effect january 1. russia is the third most popular country for americans to adopt behind china and ethiopia. >>> former president george h.w. bush remains in the intensive care unit of a houston hospital today. in a statement his longtime chief of staff urged the to put the harps back in the closet. the former president is 88 years old and has been in the hospital since november 23 for a bad case of bronchitis. he has since suffered a series of complications. >>> the national weather service has issued a new winter storm warning for the eastern half of the country as a new system threatens to cause even more travel headaches throughout the region. this comes after more than 21 inches of snow and rain already fell in the northeast. record snowfall in arkansas has left nearly 200,000 people without power. joining me now is the weather channel's kelly cass. kelly, i'm here in washington, d.c. we are hearing warnings from d.c. to maine. don't drive on saturday. you know, hunker down. what's going to hit the east coast over the weekend? >> it will get messy, that's for
vladimir putin of russia has had a news conference and says a draft bill banning u.s. adoptions of russian children is a legitimate response to a new u.s. law that calls for sanctions on russians deemed to be human rights violators. but he has not committed to signing it. he said while the majority of americans to adopt russian children are "kind and honorable," protection for abuse of victims is insufficient. the bill faces more steps before it can reach the president of russia for this signature. three senators have written to the head of sony pictures, criticizing the movie "zero dark thirty" as grossly inadequate and misleading. it suggests that torture produced the tip that led to bin laden. the senate intelligence committee chairman dianne feinstein and and others say the summit president has an obligation to say that portrait in the hunt for bin laden was a fiction and not based on fact. the lawmakers say the cia detainee who provided significant information about bin laden did so before any harsh interrogation. congress is hearing about a state department report on the september 11
who has ever had their parking spot stolen is going to love this. look at this. this is in russia. we don't know why this car is being towed. but forget the tow truck. >> it's the claw! >> the claw of death to take this car away. i have got to get me one of these. because i would just love to drive around town. >> in new york especially. >>> and speaking of cars, if you just have a little bit of money to spend, maybe $6.5 million, there's a ferrari with your name on it. it's the 250 gt-swb and it's being auctioned off in arizona. and it's the 17th model, apparently 1960s. very highly sought after. so if you have $6.5 mil, it can be yours. muhammad, you got that hanging around? >> uh, no but i think just being able to pronounce that, you get >>> this morning on "world news now" -- health concerns. former president george h.w. bush is moved to intensive care. >> he's been in a houston hospital since thanksgiving and his doctors say his health has taken an unfortunate turn. it's thursday, december 27th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> and good morning. i'm brand
braun of russia. who was inspired by them -- i found out later and realized later that everyone on that list was between the age of 4 and 13. and seeing that innovation gives them the courage to try something really hard, and that is why they did the accomplishment. my first business was an aircraft factory and it worked primarily with the public, selling plans to people to build their own home built airplanes peiping -- airplanes. we did 15 airplanes and so plans for five of them. i think now, how the heck did i do that? 15 airplanes. what was the process from selling five of them? and i only sold paper, i only seoul plans. wow, i must have a lot of fun. the voyager was built on the profits from very easy plan sales. they were based on fun, grass- roots find. the public interface. this is where we took the voyager to oshkosh. i think this is before the world flight. this was a milestone accomplishment. the interesting thing about it technically, if you have an ultimate record that is not weight class or propeller or whatever, but overall record, how to record, speed record -- u
. but competitors in china are, rush show were trading on a daily basis. -- my competitors in china and russia work training. this is a position of irritation of a triple jump. i was like a robot in the sense that everything i was doing, the hours i was putting in it, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, i trained all they basically. my first session, 10:00, i was basically of the rank by nine and my last session would be at 6:00-6:30. then i would go to the gym. i look back, no wonder i was in really good shape. >> where did that drive? how did that drive? where do you get that drive? >> we were talking earlier about the role of parents. when you had mentioned the tiger mom or the tiger parents, we did not have tiger parents. they were there to support me and be there in times when i needed a push culminated motivation. it is just one of those things when you have a passion and a vision. you do not see anything else. that is what drives you every day. >> you just got engaged. are you going to be a tiger mom. [laughter] >> looking at the way i was raised with a set of rules and just the way my
to the state department and ambassador to india, russia, israel, and other important nations. admiral mullen, as we know, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. i think that their backgrounds, their service to the country showed up starkly in the quality of the boards report, and i want to thank them for their extraordinary service to our country and i want to thank secretary clinton who appointed them, who selected them. the report pulls no punches. it tackles head on many of the questions we've been asking. the report makes 29 recommendations in total, five of which are classified. secretary clinton has embraced every single one of them, in fact, she's gone above and beyond board's recommendations by taking immediate steps to strengthen security at high threat posts and request from congress the authority to reprogram funds to increase diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. you know, in washington where too often we see recommendations of blue ribbon panels ignored, delayed, or deferred as they were for a long time even on the 9/11 commission, i think the secretary's swift action un
the second term. the u.s. ambassador to russia says he is concerned with the kremlin's response to u.s. human rights law. the russian parliament voted overwhelmingly to ban americans from adopting russian children. to impose visa band and asset freezes, and north korea detained an american citizen, the rogue nation unspecified crimes -- >> we are awaiting president obama, expecting him to speak in a few moments. we are keeping a close eye on it. what we say about the fiscal cliff. we will bring that live as it happens but in the meantime it is not just energy stocks getting hit by the gridlock, oil prices tumbling on track to snap a five day rally. phil flynn of price futures group is in the pits of the cme. whaa is going on down there? traders losing confidence in the economy and washington and the planet? phil: i don't think they have confidence in washington to begin with that they're losing confidence that we can get a fiscal cliff deal done. with plan b failing pretty miserably, a lot of traders can't see a scenario where this can get done. you can bet they're going to see what the presi
is the russians. there has been a back and forth now for months with russia but there was a hope that some. they would shift -- at some point that would shift. the idea that they may be preparing to graduate the citizens. the russians are saying they will not this about assad. and if they don't this about assad, i think that would make it extraordinarily difficult to reach some kind of negotiated solution. i think it is worth thinking about, but i decided to my mind the prospects are so slim that it is hard to put much hope in it at this point. >> questions? >> the russians are not going to deal with an iou. to me, that isn't tipping. for the russians. if they are -- to me that is a tipping point for the russians. >> what is the level of their foreign-exchange reserves? we don't know. there are reports of iran providing some amount of funding, but iran has its own issues with sanctions. my feelings on the russians is that i think what will happen with the russians is, they are not sentimental about assad. i think the russians are going to cut their losses and pull out, but not work time --
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